A Modern Take On Classics: Showcase

As I explained in a recent post I have fallen back in love with reading, books and all that good stuff. Which is wonderful, of course, but it has resulted in me wanting to buy more books now I’m back in the loop which isn’t so wonderful for my bank balance.

Nonetheless, one of my favourite ways to obtain new books is by getting them secondhand and that’s how I managed to come across these two wonderful pieces I’m about to show you today.

Although I normally try to avoid ‘novelty’ buys when it comes to books, I couldn’t resist when I saw these two.

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Although I totally understand how important classic books are and have enjoyed many that I have read, I do sometimes struggle with them. And because I know they’re going to be a lot of work, I tend to avoid a lot of these kind of books, which results in me missing lots of references.

Although I initially picked these books up as a joke and spent a few minutes by the market stall and in the shop chuckling over the retellings of the stories I had read, I realised that these books could also be quite useful in their own little way.

These two books are wonderful ways to get involved and discover what those of so popular classic books are about, but in a hilarious modern way!

THE SHOWCASE

The first one I picked up is Twitterature, by Alexander Aciman and Emmett Rensin. This, as you can tell from the title, is a retelling of various classic tales through the medium of a twitter feed. The bits I’ve read so far have been hilarious, but I’m not sure yet how I’ll feel about the stories I don’t know.

Twitterature
“The classics are so last century” Guardian
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Currently my favourite feed, Great Expectations from @piMp

Texts From Jane Eyre, by Mallory Ortberg, is very similar but clearly an older publication. And this one has illustrations! It retells a lot of classic and modern classic tales through text messages between characters and I’ve found myself chuckling at a few already.

(My copy is sadly missing it’s dust jacket hence the similar photos but hey, that’s what happens when you shop secondhand sometimes)

Texts.jpg
do you know who I hate?” “everyone?” “EVERYONE
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Texts From Jane Eyre And Other Conversations With Your Favourite Literary Characters

Have you heard of any of these books? Because I was unaware of them until this point. I’m expecting I’ll take my time with them and flick through whenever I need a bit of cheering up, or have failed to understand yet another literature reference!


Do you have any quirky books in your collection? 

I know this was a somewhat unusual post for me, as there’s more images than words, but I fancied showing off these books and wasn’t sure how. I feel like I may do some more showcase posts in the future!

Speak soon,

Rachael

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Sexism, Exploitation and Memes

I wonder how many memes there are on the internet?

They’re something we all see pretty much every time we log onto a social media site. That black and white lettering that protests some sarcastic message has basically become iconic now and will forever be recognised.

Memes are a way for people to rant, to express their opinions or just to make a joke in a quick and fashionable way and overall I think they’re pretty funny. There’s no better way to procrastinate than looking at a photo of a stupid dog with a sarcastic message printed over it.

But I wonder how many memes out there mock women? I bet most of them degrade or ridicule feminism and the actions of women in some way. Although these memes aren’t as cool as a dog wanting cupcakes or a cat with a moustache, they seem to be the most popular ones and the ones that are constantly being shared.

Obviously this is something I don’t like. But I don’t think it’s a problem to be blamed solely on the sharers, as most of these people don’t really know what they’re mocking anyway.

Recently I saw a meme which inspired this whole post. This meme basically said that women complain about men complimenting them or looking at them, but will continue to wear little clothing or present themselves in a sexual manner.

(Because obviously these actions are all just an act to attract men, right?)

The meme was basically saying “why are you complaining, woman? You obviously want this”

Now if I close my mind, I can almost see why some people would find this ironic. But it doesn’t take long for the stupidity (and a bit of fear) to come flooding back in.

People seem to think that if women want to be taken seriously, then they can’t dress in a certain way. For these people, women must not appear sexual in anyway and cover all parts of their body because, God forbid, should we see some cleavage then there’s no way we can concentrate on what these lasses are actually saying, right?

It makes me sad that some people still genuinely believe that clothing (or performances or whatever) has any impact on your rights to be taken seriously or to be heard.

As for the degrading comment…

The reason why a woman choosing, for example, to wear shorts that may reveal her vulva is not degrading is because she chose to wear them. She chose to reveal whatever part of her body she wanted and because it’s her body and her choice, this is not degrading. If you want to label it anything I’d go for empowering.

Everyone has a right to control their own bodies. And if that means they want to be sexual then let them. The problems occur when other people think they have the right to sexualise something that is not theirs. That’s why people speak out about adverts, films, posters or comments that use women’s bodies in a sexual way because the power has been taken away from the person who owns the body and given to someone outside of it.

The whole point of feminism is that people a choice, regardless of their gender. Women, like men, can freely express their sexuality if they want to. But it’s down to them to choose if that’s something they want to do. It shouldn’t be something that other people can choose for you.

Men are, of course, not excluded from this. How many washboard abs and toned physiques have you seen to promote, sell or generally just grab attention in the media recently? There’s tonnes, I know. But the reason we talk about women so much when we deal with topics like this is because it happens to us more. Plus, because it’s deemed acceptable to treat women this way we then start to do the same things to men.

It’s just not fair for anyone and it’s creating such a shitty situation.

Can’t we just let people do what they want, whether that be in fashion or sex or just life, and not feel the need to comment, judge or ridicule? Let’s be fair to one another and if you see something shitty report it and try to educate those who don’t understand why it’s wrong.

And before you ask, yes I can take a joke. I just prefer my jokes to have more humour than spite.


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*affiliate link used

Speak soon,

Rachael.


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